Why linking organizational and employee efficiency transformation is critical for to remain competitive Assignment Sample

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Why linking organizational and employee efficiency transformation is critical for to remain competitive Assignment 

Society and business alike often use the concept “change” to describe the inevitability of these two constants. The concept of transition will be a major focus for the organisation in the next years. Companies need to be aware of these trends. An organisational shift occurs when a corporation chooses to alter its business strategy or its physical assets. As a consequence of these advancements, businesses become more productive and efficient. A broad variety of factors, both internal and external, drive organisational change. From the inside, employees who are uninformed of the changes and who stand to profit from them may oppose the reforms. What determines how effectively a practitioner controls circumstances to reduce opposition and successfully implement change in organisations is the practitioner’s abilities and skills (Schwarzmüller et al., 2018). To summarise, organisational changes cause conflict. An organization’s long-term viability and sustainability may be ensured by continued growth and expansion as a result of organisational reform. Due to the intense competition and quick growth that today’s businesses confront; it is imperative that they keep up with the ever-evolving requirements of their customers (Buil, Martínez and Matute, 2019). As a result, in today’s fast-paced business environment, innovation is essential. As the competitive environment changes, businesses are always battling to stay up with the rapid speed of change. The quality of changes is decided when an organisation examines how relevant, appropriate, and sufficient information regarding the change process in an organisation is for its members. However, the efforts of business practitioners to convince workers to change their behaviour in a manner that is beneficial to the firm are necessary for organisational transformation. A successful implementation of organisational transformation will be critical.

As a result, organisations must be big enough to profit from economies of scale in order to get a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Large companies may lead the industry in terms of cost savings compared to their smaller counterparts. As a result, a company’s scale is seen as a sustainable competitive advantage. Firm size and profitability have been shown to be linked in recent studies. In the opinion of Para-González, Jiménez-Jiménez and Martínez-Lorente (2018), the sheer quantity of human resources a company employs has a significant influence on its overall success.

Project Plan

The project will be formalised in an asymmetrical manner where each activity will be followed by the completion of the another. In the following the key objectives and activity timeline of the research is contextualised.

Research Objectives

  • To rationalise the importance of organisational and employee efficiency transformation?
  • To ascertain the interrelation between organisational performance and employee performance?
  • To discern how organisational and employee efficiency transformation aids competitive edge?

Project Timeline

Activities

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Research proposal making

Research Report making

Data Collection

Data Analysis

Summarisation and Findings development

Methodology

People’s perspectives, perceptions, and opinions about a topic may be elicited using the mix methodological approach. As a result, this context emphasises theoretical data, which is generated by extensive data collection and analysis. The study topic will be gathered using primary and secondary data collecting methods. As a result, an interview was conducted as part of the study (Le and Lei, 2019). Researchers will keep a close eye on the material being collected and note the most pertinent details to be included in the final report. Researchers are increasingly turning to practises that allow for continuous iteration as part of their research methods, and this approach is becoming more popular in a variety of settings. As a result of combining data gathering, analysis, and interpretation under the umbrella of an exhaustive study, the conclusive approach is a technique that yields concrete answers to the research problems it addresses. It’s used to get particular findings for study. It provides a useful response to the unique research and aids in the creation of informed choices.

Probability sampling will also be used to generate a random sample of data for data sampling. It is possible to choose data and information at random using probability sampling. In a research study, data sampling is just as important (Buil, Martínez and Matute, 2019). What it does is provide a simple explanation of how to get the appropriate data and information that is needed to answer research questions. The data sampling procedure is completed when data and information patterns are identified. Probability and non-probability sampling approaches may be used to collect the data. Nonprobability sampling, on the other hand, is based on the researcher’s ability to quickly and easily select important data points (Yue, Men and Ferguson, 2019). Because it yields reliable data, random sampling will be used in this research for both the literature review and the interview analysis.

Analysis of data is a crucial part of data collecting, and findings are utilised to draw useful conclusions about the research. Primary and qualitative data analysis are the two methods used to examine information. To speed up the research process, this study employed qualitative data analysis, which focuses on information gathering via observation and interviews. With this method, researchers may get the information they need to perform their investigations more quickly and easily.

Having a research plan is still important since it aids in the development of sensible study procedures by researchers. The three most common research approaches are deductive, inductive, and abductive (Stouten, Rousseau and De Cremer, 2018). According to the deductive method, the study’s focus will be on verifying well-established facts and determining whether or not new ideas and information are feasible and relevant to the topic under consideration. Abductive research is characterised by the discovery of new facts and unforeseen difficulties throughout the course of the inquiry (Para-González et al., 2018). The inductive method indicates that research can only be done via the eyes of the beholder. The deductive research technique will be used in this inquiry since it may broaden the scope of the investigation from a narrow to a broad one.

To get a competitive advantage, firms must be big enough to take advantage of economies of scale. Large companies may lead the industry in terms of cost savings compared to their smaller counterparts. As a result, a company’s scale is seen as a sustainable competitive advantage. Firm size and profitability have been shown to be linked in recent studies. In the opinion of (), the sheer quantity of human resources a company employs has a significant influence on its overall success.

Literature Review (Secondary Findings)

Analysing the key prospects of business change

As a result of a change in procedure, technology, rules, and regulations, or a change in organisational culture, the term “organisational change” is instigated (Schwarzmüller et al., 2018). A third definition is “arising from a different level.”. Similar to the development and implementation of new ideas, the process of change is also a process.

One of the most widely used and inevitably occurring terms in modern culture and business is “change” (Buil, Martínez and Matute, 2019). The company sees change as a crucial idea in the next years (Le and Lei, 2019). As a result, companies need to be aware of these developments in order to survive. In the event that a company intends to modify its business strategy or other physical assets, organisational changes take occur. Organizations become more productive and efficient as a result of these developments. Organizational change may be triggered by a variety of circumstances, both internal and external. Internal variables, such as workers of the company, may be a challenge because of their lack of understanding and financial incentives. Organizational changes produce conflict, and the ability and skill of the practitioner to regulate the conditions in an effective manner is what helps to reduce opposition and successfully execute change in the company. The primary goal of organisational change in an organisation is to ensure its long-term viability and sustainability, which may be achieved via the organization’s ongoing development and expansion. Today’s firms operate in a highly competitive and expanding environment, making organisational transformation an increasingly vital issue (Yue, Men and Ferguson, 2019).

There are many reasons why business professionals make adjustments to their organisations. These include the need for organisations, organisational processes, changes to organisational functions, adjustments to the organization’s values, adjustments to human behaviour, and adjustments to the organization’s authorised personnel and responsibilities (Stouten, Rousseau and De Cremer, 2018). There are several sorts of change that may be difficult for business practitioners to effectively execute. These include product and marketing and sales activity changes, as well as structural and cultural changes. Structure in an organisation is defined as “the formal system of authority, connections, and responsibilities that regulates and coordinates the activities and behaviour of employees in order to accomplish objectives” (Para-González et al., 2018). Employee connections are influenced by organisational structure and its effect on the contemporary organisation, which has an effective communication system in place, resulting in a modern organisation (Quintero and Adolfo, 2004; Wahba, 2014). In their study, Buil, Martínez and Matute (2019) identified the structure as “the architecture of business competency, leadership, talent, functional linkages, and arrangement”. In order to ensure that things are carried out in an efficient and effective way, various organisations use different organisational structures as a controller device.

Evaluating the prospects of employee efficiency towards organisational change

Structural changes are both internal and external alterations to an organization’s organisation structure (Al-Okaily et al., 2020). Structural modifications are any alterations to the organization’s structure, chain of command, management systems, or administrative procedures. Structural change is needed to adapt to changes in the market, acquisitions, job duplication, and legislation changes. According to Yamin (2020) structural changes within an organisation may be induced by both internal and external pressures. The ability to identify the core causes of organisational change is essential to effective change management. Recognition of organisational change indicators may aid management in preparing and implementing policies that will keep a company on a path to success hence the structure of a business may be significantly altered through mergers and acquisitions, according to Sembiring, Rahayu and Sembiring (2021). According to Khan, Tufail and Ali (2021), an organization’s top leaders and managers may need a shift and in response workers may either get upset by having to deal with several leaders, or they may find ways to use the differing opinions of their leaders to their advantage. When employees are presented with duplicate managerial responsibilities, the organization’s structure must be reformed. By shifting its business strategy, Halawi and Haydar (2018) claims that structural changes may occur. As a result, the organization’s structure will change if it had previously been used to autonomous departments. When a new department is created, the organization’s structure must be restructured to accommodate it. Yet, having available with employees prospective to change aids in smoother transition and in turn if the change is fruitful and is diligently accepted and adapted by the employees then such changes eventually lead to better adaptability and efficacy which entails prospects for better performance enhancements.

Analysing the context of organisational change

As a result of a change in procedure, technology, rules, and regulations, or a change in organisational culture, the term “organisational change” is used (Afanasyev et al., 2019). Moving from one level to the next is another way of putting it. To put it another way, the process of change is one of coming up with and putting into action new ideas. Change is a constantly used and unavoidable concept in both society and business (Wang, 2019). The company sees change as a crucial idea in the next years (Jassim and Jaber, 1998). As a result, companies need to be aware of these developments in order to survive. In the event that a company intends to modify its business strategy or other physical assets, organisational changes take occur. Organizations become more productive and efficient as a result of these developments (Trenerry et al., 2021; Sembiring, Rahayu and Sembiring, 2021; Stouten, Rousseau and De Cremer, 2018). Organizational change may be triggered by a variety of circumstances, both internal and external. Internal variables, such as workers of the company, may be a challenge because of their lack of understanding and financial incentives. Organizational changes produce conflict, and the ability and skill of the practitioner to regulate the conditions in an effective manner is what helps to reduce opposition and successfully execute change in the company. The primary goal of organisational change in an organisation is to ensure its long-term viability and sustainability, which may be achieved via the organization’s ongoing development and expansion. Organizational transformation has become more vital in today’s highly competitive and rapidly expanding business environment (Para-González et al., 2018).

There are many reasons for business practitioners to make changes in their organisations, such as the need for organisations, organisational process, the need to modify the organisational functions, the need to change its values, and the need to change human behaviour (Buil, Martínez and Matute, 2019). There are several sorts of change that may be difficult for business practitioners to effectively execute. These include product and marketing and sales activity changes, as well as structural and cultural changes. Structure in an organisation is defined as “the formal system of authority, connections, and responsibilities that regulates and coordinates the activities and behaviour of employees in order to accomplish objectives” (Al-Okaily et al., 2020). Employee connections are influenced by organisational structure and the way it is organised. This leads to a contemporary company with an effective communication system that is built on teamwork and decentralisation of authority (Trenerry et al., 2021; ÇET?NKAYA, NIAVAND and RASHID, 2019). “Structure is the architecture of business competency, leadership, talent, functional linkages, and arrangement,” said Murphy (2002) in their study. In order to ensure that they are carried out in the most efficient and effective way possible, various organisations use a variety of organisational structures as controllers (Yamin, 2020). The culture of a company’s workplace undergoes transformation when the organization’s culture is altered (Sembiring, Rahayu and Sembiring, 2021). A company’s culture may be described by Para-González et al. (2018) as “the collective beliefs and behaviours of workers that show the strategic direction of the enterprise. “Culture is a driving force behind strategy and a controllable internal variable” The term “culture” is used to describe a company’s set of values and beliefs, as well as the manner in which people interact with each other in the workplace (Schwarzmüller et al., 2018). Positive or negative feelings in workers may be triggered by various reasons, including the change process that is used, leadership style or nature, and the personality of employees. Organizational culture (Buil, Martínez and Matute, 2019). Organizational culture and transformation are intertwined, as are the two. The emotional reaction to change may be triggered by, for example, an employee’s like or disliking of their co-workers in the workplace culture (Yue, Men and Ferguson, 2019). All parts of business have undergone radical transformation as a result of technological innovation. The entire performance of a firm may be affected by changes in manufacturing methods, service delivery methods, and working conditions due to technological advancements (Wang, 2019). As a result, businesses are putting their whole energy into upgrading their technology infrastructure and using automation solutions. According to Buil, Martínez and Matute (2019), there are three phases to Kurt Lewin’s organisational transformation model: Unfreezing, Change, and Refreezing. Unfreezing: what’s the first step, what’s the goal, how do we get there, and how do we keep the staff on board? One may start with a task or a cultural or technical shift at this point. While the third step is Refreezing, think about how to keep the transformation going.

Nevertheless, any effort or collection of activities resulting from a change in direction or advancement that has an impact on how an organisation functions is considered an act of organisational change (Le and Lei, 2019). A change is a transition from one state to another. It may either be deliberate and planned by the organization’s management, or it might come from outside the organisation and be beyond of the organization’s control. According Para-González, Jiménez-Jiménez and Martínez-Lorente (2018), a company’s strategies for accomplishing its goal, strategy implementation, jobs and duties done by employees inside the organisation, as well as relationships between those employees, may be affected by change. Change, according to Schwarzmüller et al. (2018), is an unavoidable part of every organization’s life. Consequently, he says an organisation cannot survive in today’s economic world if it does not evolve. New client demands or growing competition in the market may necessitate an organization’s transition towards a new mode of operation. Yue, Men and Ferguson (2019) state that well-planned changes to an organization’s structure assist ensure the organization’s long-term survival. It has the potential to increase a company’s competitiveness, financial success, and the happiness of its customers and employees. Organizations must realise that change might cause stress responses among workers and establish internal organisational procedures and circumstances that are essential for successful coping to take place, according to Buil, Martínez and Matute (2019). Jassim and Jaber (1998) says that organisational adjustments are important to keep organisational tactics viable. Organizational change is becoming more and more common in the workplace, which means that employees have more options for professional advancement.

Effect of strategic change on employee performance

Changes in a company’s strategy, by definition, include changes in the company’s competitive advantages, scope, resources, and synergies. To put it another way, strategic shift is a technique for a corporation to adjust its goals and vision in order to be more successful. When it comes to strategic transformation as defined by Stouten, Rousseau and De Cremer (2018), it means changing an organization’s long-term vision and long-term strategic objectives. In Stouten, Rousseau and De Cremer (2018) view, it is a big disruption since this sort of shift might need an organisation to reassess its core approach to business in order to adapt. Some examples of strategy shifts include changes to the goods or services it provides, the target client segments or market it aims to reach, and who it will partner with for manufacturing suppliers, distributors and other logistical requirements. The majority of organisations fail to execute change appropriately and thoroughly, while others fail to convey the change to their staff, as stated by Halawi and Haydar (2018). Regardless of how widespread the change will be, it will all be for nothing if staff aren’t properly on board. Managers in charge of strategic change should consider the following, according to Afanasyev et al. (2019). (i) it is difficult to change long-standing habits and practises; (ii) careful consideration must be given to the context compatibility of the change with the organisation; and (iii) a mismatch between the context of the change and the organisation should be avoided at all costs. Managers and staff will have a new perspective on how the firm runs as a result of this shift in perspective.

Primary Findings (Interview Analysis)

The following is a substantive interview analysis that is formalised in a manner of primary data analytics. The interview is arranged with the association of general management of a business. For maintaining anonymity, the background information and identification of the participant is not disclosed.

Q1. What is the key importance of transformation for both organisation and employee efficiency?

For a company to thrive and expand, it will need a change in its organizational system. The successful implementation and use of change within an organisation is driven by effective change management. Employees are better able to commit to their shift and do their best job when they are aware of what is expected of them. New company ideas and prospects may be found and nurtured by businesses that are able to accept change. Embracing the new methods of working will open up new opportunities for any company with effective change management tactics. This in turn leads to extensive level of inventive ness among the employees which contributes to the development of employee efficiency. Thereby, a business with loads of efficient employees eventually leads to better performance and that in consequence leads to growth and development in a substantive manner.

Q2. How organisational performance and employee efficiency interrelates with each other?

As a business owner, your team’s ability to follow work processes and accomplish desired outcomes is a major factor in your success. Effectiveness is the term for this. Success may also be measured by the efficiency with which your staff complete tasks and how little time, effort, or resources they waste doing so. Efficiency is the term for this. Both principles are similar when used in a commercial context, but there are key differences to keep your organisation on a lucrative path. In all of your productivity concerns, effectiveness must take precedence. Doing the right things is a key component of success. Make sure all of your objectives are serving your aims, which in turn serve your goals. Leader’s mission is to serve customers in a manner that meets their wants and aspirations, whereas your objectives are short-term results. Hence, with a productive and efficient team the productivity can be substantiated which eventually aids to better performance and this interrelation ultimately contributes in the welfare of the business.

Q3. How linkage between organisational and employee efficiency ensures long-term competitive edge?

Having a proficient team aid to the development internal efficacy within the business, this enables substantive development and performance for tasks at hand. Thereby, having the competent team with prominent performance assurance adds to the development of competitiveness for the business, this in turn entails a significant overhaul of business performance and efficacy for longer haul.

References

Afanasyev, V.V., Ivanova, O.A., Rezakov, R.G., Afanasyev, I.V. and Kunitsyna, S.M., 2019. Organizational environment for the schoolchildrens’ professional identities: establishing, modelling, efficiency expectations and long-term development. International journal of civil engineering and technology10(2), p.1612.

Al-Okaily, A., Al-Okaily, M., Shiyyab, F. and Masadah, W., 2020. Accounting information system effectiveness from an organizational perspective. Management Science Letters10(16), pp.3991-4000.

Buil, I., Martínez, E. and Matute, J., 2019. Transformational leadership and employee performance: The role of identification, engagement and proactive personality. International Journal of Hospitality Management77, pp.64-75.

Buil, I., Martínez, E. and Matute, J., 2019. Transformational leadership and employee performance: The role of identification, engagement and proactive personality. International Journal of Hospitality Management77, pp.64-75.

ÇET?NKAYA, A.?., NIAVAND, A. and RASHID, M., 2019. Organizational change and competitive advantage: Business size matters. Business & Management Studies: An International Journal7(3), pp.40-67.

Halawi, A. and Haydar, N., 2018. Effects of Training on Employee Performance: A Case Study of Bonjus and Khatib & Alami Companies. International Humanities Studies5(2).

Jassim, R.K. and Jaber, G., 1998. Competitive advantage through the employees. Research paper, University of Auckland New Zealand.

Khan, A.J., Tufail, S. and Ali, A., 2021. Factors Affecting Performance of Small & Medium Enterprises: The Mediating Role of Knowledge Management. Pakistan Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences9(2), pp.197-209.

Le, P.B. and Lei, H., 2019. Determinants of innovation capability: the roles of transformational leadership, knowledge sharing and perceived organizational support. Journal of knowledge management.

Murphy, M., 2002. Organisational change and firm performance.

Para-González, L., Jiménez-Jiménez, D. and Martínez-Lorente, A.R., 2018. Exploring the mediating effects between transformational leadership and organizational performance. Employee Relations.

Para-González, L., Jiménez-Jiménez, D. and Martínez-Lorente, A.R., 2018. Exploring the mediating effects between transformational leadership and organizational performance. Employee Relations.

Schwarzmüller, T., Brosi, P., Duman, D. and Welpe, I.M., 2018. How does the digital transformation affect organizations? Key themes of change in work design and leadership. Management Revue29(2), pp.114-138.

Sembiring, M.G., Rahayu, G. and Sembiring, R.H., 2021. The role of organisational performance in moderating human resource management and outstanding outcomes in open distance learning context. International Journal of Mobile Learning and Organisation15(2), pp.212-231.

Stouten, J., Rousseau, D.M. and De Cremer, D., 2018. Successful organizational change: Integrating the management practice and scholarly literatures. Academy of Management Annals12(2), pp.752-788.

Trenerry, B., Chng, S., Wang, Y., Suhaila, Z.S., Lim, S.S., Lu, H.Y. and Oh, P.H., 2021. Preparing workplaces for digital transformation: an integrative review and framework of multi-level factors. Frontiers in psychology12, p.822.

Wang, C.H., 2019. How organizational green culture influences green performance and competitive advantage: The mediating role of green innovation. Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management.

Yamin, M.A.Y., 2020. Examining the effect of organisational innovation on employee creativity and firm performance: moderating role of knowledge sharing between employee creativity and employee performance. International Journal of Business Innovation and Research22(3), pp.447-467.

Yue, C.A., Men, L.R. and Ferguson, M.A., 2019. Bridging transformational leadership, transparent communication, and employee openness to change: The mediating role of trust. Public relations review45(3), p.101779.

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